1.10.2009

Who Wants to be a Millionaire?

I was in Barnes & Noble over the holidays and ran across this book in the Christian section. It's called Becoming a Millionaire God's Way. I have not read this book at all, so I'm definitely not downing it or bashing it. I just took a picture of the cover, because it just struck me so weird. Here's a write up on it from Amazon.com:

"This newly revised and expanded edition decries the myth that Christians must be poor and gives readers the keys to financial prosperity. Dr. Anderson combines biblical principles with expert financial advice, equipping readers with the tools they need to attain the riches they deserve. An invaluable resource for current or would-be investors or entrepreneurs, this book not only inspires readers to become educated about finances but also spurs them on to action and compels them to move forward confidently to achieve their financial dreams."

I personally, don't have any kind of drive to become a very wealthy person in society's terms, so maybe that's why it sounded strange. I know people who are Christians and are millionaires, so I don't think it's a sin to be financially wealthy, but I wonder about that title. I'm just not sure. So, I thought I'd ask all of you...

Should we make it a goal to become a millionaire?

2 comments:

Ben said...

I cringe a little when I see books like this. I have not problem with Christians being wealthy, but I don't think Christians, those of who follow Christ, who chase after God, should ever being chasing anything else. God is faithful and loving, and he will give us not just what we need but exactly what he knows is best for us. It seems to me that by chasing after wealth or anything else - girls/boys, fame, whatever - that we are saying we know better than God what our lives should look like. *steps off the soapbox and slowly backs away*

Matt W. said...

I agree, it's no sin to be wealthy, but it is a sin to be greedy. Like you, I don't know anything about the book but the Amazon.com write up is replete with warning bells (like getting the wealth you deserve and such). True enough that Christians need not be destitute, but becoming a millionaire just isn't a worthy goal for a Christian either.

Phil 4:11 Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.